Perspectives of migrant mothers

Working on an assignment for Stichting Opvoeden, a Foundation which validates online parenting information in the Netherlands.
Focus of the assignment is to inform the Foundation on views and habits in parenting from the perspectives of migrant mothers without formal education experience, who live in the Netherlands. Methods; questionnaires and narrative analysis of a group based community programme in The Hague.
Interested in this work? Please respond to this update through the contact form.

Progress in proficiency and participation: an adult learning approach to support social integration of migrants in Western societies

This book reflects the contributions to a conference on Linguistic Integration of Adult Migrants (Council of Europe, 2016).

Chapter 4, p. 201-206

Abstract:

Educational courses that exist to support migrants in their efforts to participate in a host society should be properly designed with pedagogical expertise. In this paper, we clarify basic principles of adult learning, using the Themis method as an example. Instead of a fixed curriculum which aims to teach dominant and stereotypical cultural habits, a participatory approach fosters the development of new kinds of awareness and new ways of coping with the differences between cultures, and leads to more profound results in terms of self-confidence, participation, empowerment and language proficiency.

Christa Nieuwboer & Rogier van ’t Rood

> Link to the Chapter (Open Access)

Full reference:

Nieuwboer, C.C. & Rood van’t, R. Progress in proficiency and participation. An adult learning approach to support social integration of migrants in western societies. In: Beacco, J.-C., Little, D., Krumm, H.-J. and Thalgott, Ph. (eds.) (2017), The Linguistic Integration of Adult Migrants: Some Lessons from Research. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton in cooperation with the  Council of Europe.

https://www.degruyter.com/viewbooktoc/product/472830

Technology rules. Looking for small data in a big data world. #fightinequality blog

“Who has access to information?” During a recent workshop everybody gave an optimistic answer: everyone has access, if they want to. Don’t they? Exploring this a little bit further, I was astonished by the way we take our own perspective for granted. The next question: “Who decides on new policies” suddenly brought on uneasiness and worry.

Read my blog post here: >> Januari 2017 Fight Inequality Technology rules

Blogpost for the Fight Inequality Week, 14-20 January 2017 #fightinequality

Chapter: Peer and professional online support for parents

Cover PsychSocNetw

The Internet provides a popular and convenient source of information and support on parenting, offering many opportunities for both peer and professional support. Recent studies have also shown that both parents and children can benefit from online parenting support.
In this chapter, we describe the current variety of online services for parents, distinguishing between peer support and professional support. Specifically we will focus on the design characteristics of these web-based resources. Since Internet technology is still rapidly developing, many new opportunities for social networking are available. The provision of multilayered interaction (many-to-many, one-tomany, one-to-one) and the use of multiple components in websites may enhance the way parents feel supported. Also, training can be added to online programs, which aims to change parental knowledge, behavior and attitude. Furthermore, we discuss experimental results from recent meta-analytic study on the effects of online parental education.
Providing an overview of the past decade, we discuss two major trends which give direction to future research and development: missing aspects of research on online social networking and  inspiring opportunities for online professional support for parents.

Christa Nieuwboer

Ruben Fukkink

Open Access hyperlink to the chapter (DOI)

Why was my Dutch daughter in tears over #Brexit?

My daughter, who is 16, cried bitter tears over the Brexit-result. She loves Great Britain and has plans to study in England. She so much hoped migrants would not be bashed by this vote yet again. But most of all, she hurts because her trust in humanity is suffering badly. She witnesses the victory of the fast and negative sentiments over the slow and positive ones.

Read my column here:

Scoring on immigration – or making an effort for integration?